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  • Architect/Firm:  Levi Scofield
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Name: Levi Tucker Scofield

Birth/Established: November 9, 1842   Death/Dissolved: February 25, 1917

 


Biography:  
  Levi Tucker Scofield (nee Schofield) was born in Cleveland and was raised in a home on Euclid Avenue near East 9th Street. His family later operated the Prospect Place Hotel on the site after which it became the location of the Schofield Building, which he designed. Levi Scofield attended Cleveland public schools, pursuing the study of architecture and engineering. At some point, he dropped the "H" from his name. In 1860 he moved to Cincinnati. He served in the Ohio 113th Infantry, rising in the rank to First Lieutenant and Captain. He wrote "The Retreat from Pulaski to Nashville, Battle of Franklin, Tennessee, November 30, 1864" which was published in 1909. After the war he returned to Cleveland. In 1867 he married Elizabeth C. Wright, who was prominent in local society and philanthropic circles. She was president of the YWCA, the Phyllis Wheatley Association, and organized the Cleveland Vocal Society.

Levi Scofield is remembered as the architect of large Victorian era institutions that included the Asylum for the Insane in Athens and Columbus, Ohio, the North Carolina Penitentiary, the Ohio Penitentiary in Mansfield, and the Cleveland House of Corrections. His firm designed five Cleveland Public Schools between 1869 and 1883. He devoted seven and a half years, without compensation, to the Cuyahoga County Soldiers and Sailors Monument, and contributed over $57,000 of its total cost. He was the first Cleveland architect taken into membership in the American Institute of Architects and was a friend and golfing partner of John D. Rockefeller.

Scofield was the sculptor of "These are my Jewels," a Civil War Monument installed at the Columbian Exposition in Chicago in 1893, later moved to the grounds of the Ohio State Capitol. The Schofield Office Building on the southwest corner of Euclid and East 9th Street, built in 1900, was built on the Schofield homestead and was originally owned by Levi Scofield. He had two sons, William Marshall Scofield (1868-1942) and Sherman Wright Scofield (1876-1942) who became members of his architectural firm. The Scofields were members of First Baptist Church and are buried in Lake View Cemetery. 

 

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Building Name Date Address Status
1867
Euclid Avenue
Cleveland
Unbuilt
1868

Athens
Standing
1869
4201 Orchard Avenue
Cleveland
Demolished
1869

Xenia
Standing
1869-70
7706 Woodland Avenue
Cleveland
Demolished
1870

Cleveland
Demolished
1870

Jefferson
Standing
1870-7
1960 West Broad Street
Columbus
Demolished
1870-84
1300 Western Avenue
Raleigh
Demolished
1875
7817 Euclid Avenue
Cleveland
Demolished
1878
2409 Euclid Avenue
Cleveland
Demolished
1878
2200 East 55th Street
Cleveland
Demolished
1879-80
3427 Fulton Road
Cleveland
Demolished
1880
Superior and Seneca and Long
Cleveland
Demolished
1880
3407 Prospect Avenue
Cleveland
Demolished
1881
7910 Broadway
Cleveland
Demolished
1882
408 West St. Clair Street
Cleveland
Standing
1884
1401 West 3rd Street
Cleveland
Demolished
1884

Cleveland
Demolished
1886
100 Reformatory Road
Mansfield
Standing
1886-94
3 Public Square
Cleveland
Standing
1891
Huron and Prospect alley
Cleveland
Demolished
1894
235 Superior Avenue
Cleveland
Demolished
1894

Conneaut
Demolished
1898
2438 Mapleside Road
Cleveland
Standing
1901
2000 East 9th Street
Cleveland
Standing
1906-8
1710 Prospect Avenue
Cleveland
Standing
c 1882-3
4811 Euclid Avenue
Cleveland
Demolished
c 1882-5
1953 Euclid Avenue
Cleveland
Demolished
c 1885-6
2343 Euclid Avenue
Cleveland
Demolished
c 1886
55 North Mulberry Street
Mansfield
Standing

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"Levi T. Scofield Removed by Death" Plain Dealer February 26, 1917

"Mrs. Scofield Dies, Leader of Women" Plain Dealer January 8, 1914

"Mrs. L.T. Scofield YWCA Head Dies" Leader January 3, 1914

Book of Clevelanders (1914) p.234-5

Member AIA - 1894 Directory

Orth, Samuel; A History of Cleveland, Ohio (1910), p. 768 - 771


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